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Fantasia

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I love a lot of the artwork produced to promote Fantasia. Look at the cover illustration of this book, published around the release date of the film in 1940. Classy and elegant, capturing the essence if the film.
The poster below is from Denmark. Probably for a later release.




This one definitely has the color vibe from a re-release, perhaps during the 1950s or 1960s.



Fantasia had plenty of product tie ins. This ad aiming toward brides with good taste and slim budget is from 1941.



More products created for several re-releases of the film.



The man who got movie going audiences interested in classical music. Myself included!



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digdoug
15 hours ago
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Louisville, KY
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Homework

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(via reddit)
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digdoug
9 days ago
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Louisville, KY
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RIP Kenny Shopsin

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Shopsins

Word is filtering through the NYC food community that Kenny Shopsin has passed away. Together with his wife and children, Shopsin was the proprietor of Shopsin’s General Store, an iconic NYC restaurant, an establishment.

Calvin Trillin wrote a profile of Shopsin and the restaurant for the New Yorker in 2002.

One evening, when the place was nearly full, I saw a party of four come in the door; a couple of them may have been wearing neckties, which wouldn’t have been a plus in a restaurant whose waitress used to wear a T-shirt that said “Die Yuppie Scum.” Kenny took a quick glance from the kitchen and said, “No, we’re closed.” After a brief try at appealing the decision, the party left, and the waitress pulled the security gate partway down to discourage other latecomers.

“It’s only eight o’clock,” I said to Kenny.

“They were nothing but strangers,” he said.

“I think those are usually called customers,” I said. “They come here, you give them food, they give you money. It’s known as the restaurant business.”

Kenny shrugged. “Fuck ‘em,” he said.

Kenny’s daughter Tamara published a memoir recently called Arbitrary Stupid Goal…I read it last month and loved it. The book is not only a love letter to her family’s restaurant and the old West Village (which is now almost entirely gone), but also to her father, who is featured on nearly every page.

Shopsin published a cookbook back in 2008, Eat Me: The Food and Philosophy of Kenny Shopsin.

“Pancakes are a luxury, like smoking marijuana or having sex. That’s why I came up with the names Ho Cakes and Slutty Cakes. These are extra decadent, but in a way, every pancake is a Ho Cake.” Thus speaks Kenny Shopsin, legendary (and legendarily eccentric, ill-tempered, and lovable) chef and owner of the Greenwich Village restaurant (and institution), Shopsin’s, which has been in existence since 1971.

Kenny has finally put together his 900-plus-item menu and his unique philosophy-imagine Elizabeth David crossed with Richard Pryor-to create Eat Me, the most profound and profane cookbook you’ll ever read. His rants-on everything from how the customer is not always right to the art of griddling; from how to run a small, ethical, and humane business to how we all should learn to cook in a Goodnight Moon world where everything you need is already in your own home and head-will leave you stunned or laughing or hungry.

Much love to the Shopsin family right now.

Tags: Arbitrary Stupid Goal   books   Calvin Trillin   Eat Me   food   Kenny Shopsin   NYC   restaurants   Shopsins   Tamara Shopsin
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digdoug
16 days ago
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I finished this book yesterday. I'm guessing Kottke is where I heard about it. It was supremely entertaining... That version of NYC is so long gone now.
Louisville, KY
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The Pixar food guide for Disneyland

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This booklet was in my hotel and it was such a glorious tour of on-theme junk food I had to photograph every page to share here. Of course I did seek out the corn dog with cheese in it and the alien macaroon and the meatball cone. It was all worth it.



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digdoug
20 days ago
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This makes me wanna go back so bad. I want one of each of the things. I will be a good consumer!
Louisville, KY
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Painting the skin you live in

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School Colors

For the beginning of school, second-grade teacher Aeriale Johnson had each of her students mix up a container of paint that matched their skin color so they could use it in paintings of themselves during the rest of the school year.

We started with a base of brown or peach tempera for each child then, in small groups, added white, yellow, red, dark brown and/or green to get to just the right hue. They looked like they were at Ulta trying to find foundation. :) The conversations were great!

Tags: Aeriale Johnson   art   color   education
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digdoug
21 days ago
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Louisville, KY
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When traveling, avoid The Algorithmic Trap

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2018 Roadtrip

In a piece called The Algorithmic Trap, David Perell writes about the difficulty of finding serendipity, diversity, and “real” experiences while traveling. In short, Google, Yelp, Instagram, and the like have made travel destinations and experiences increasingly predictable and homogeneous.

Call me old-fashioned, but the more I travel, the less I depend on algorithms. In a world obsessed with efficiency, I find myself adding friction to my travel experience. I’ve shifted away from digital recommendations, and towards human ones.

For all the buzz about landmarks and sightseeing, I find that immersive, local experiences reveal the surprising, culturally-specific ways of living and thinking that make travel educational. We over-rate the importance of visiting the best-places and under-rate the importance of connecting with the best people. If you want to learn about a culture, nothing beats personalized time with a passionate local who can share the magic of their culture with you.

There’s one problem with this strategy: this kind of travel doesn’t scale. It’s in efficiency and doesn’t conform to the 80/20 rule. It’s unpredictable and things could go wrong.

Travel — when done right — is challenging. Like all face-to-face interaction, it’s inefficient. The fact that an experience can’t be found in a guidebook is precisely what makes it so special. Sure, a little tip helps — go here, go there; eat here, eat there; stay here, stay there — but at the end of the day, the great pleasures of travel are precisely what you can’t find on Yelp.

Algorithms are great at giving you something you like, but terrible at giving you something you love. Worse, by promoting familiarity, algorithms punish culture.

While reading parts of this, I was reminded of both premium mediocre and the randomness of this approach to travel.

I took the photo above in the Beartooth Mountains on my recent roadtrip. This was one of the surprise highlights of my trip…I wouldn’t have known to take the road through those mountains had it not been recommended to me by some enthusiastic locals.

Tags: David Perell   travel
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digdoug
22 days ago
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Louisville, KY
WorldMaker
20 days ago
I am a big fan of picking a direction and letting my feet decide. Also, a useful skill it's learning to recognize the local Yelp Elite folks in an area and perusing just their reviews. Although an interesting counter anecdote to using local recs is that I seriously believe Cincinnati to be a Reverse Yelp city where for some reason (I hate to think it poor taste, so let's call it "ironic art"), Yelp scores are backwards (a 5-star McDonald's? a Mom and Pop meditteranean place with a soul and tasty food manages only 2-stars on a good day?), and it seems there most of the worst reviews come from the most local folks. So weird.
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