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The Last Time That a Hot Metal Typesetting Process Was Used to Print the New York Times

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In 1978, filmmaker David Loeb Weiss and typesetter Carl Schlesinger documented the memorable final night in which hot metal typesetting was used to print The New York Times. Entitled “ETAOIN SHRDLU“, a unique linotype phrase, the film spotlighted each part played and captured the varying reactions of the staff to the new computer-based cold printing process.

This film shows the entire newspaper production process from hot-metal typesetting to creating stereo moulds to high-speed press operation. At the end of the film, the new typesetting and photographic production process is shown in contrast to the old ways. There are interviews with workers at NYT that are for and against the new technology. In fact, one typesetter is retiring on this final day as he does not want to learn the new process and technology.

via Digg

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digdoug
13 days ago
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Just finished a book on the history of Paper (and printing). Appropos.
Louisville, KY
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Images From Offworld (25 photos)

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Robotic probes launched by NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and others are gathering information all across the solar system. We currently have spacecraft in orbit around the Sun, Venus, Earth, Mars, Ceres, a comet, Jupiter, and Saturn; two operational rovers on Mars; and a recent close flyby of Pluto. Astronauts aboard the International Space Station are still performing experiments in low Earth orbit and sending back amazing photos. With all these eyes in the sky, I’d once again like to put together a recent photo album of our solar system—a set of family portraits—as seen by our astronauts and mechanical emissaries. This time, we have a photo of a long-lost lander found on the surface of a comet, new images of Jupiter’s polar regions, color photos from the surface of Mars, a double eclipse of the Sun, and, of course, lovely images of our home, planet Earth.

This image from NASA's Juno spacecraft provides a never-before-seen perspective on Jupiter's south pole. The JunoCam instrument acquired the view on August 27, 2016, when the spacecraft was about 58,700 miles (94,500 kilometers) above the polar region. At this point, the spacecraft was about an hour past its closest approach, and fine detail in the south polar region is clearly resolved. Unlike the equatorial region's familiar structure of belts and zones, the poles are mottled by clockwise and counterclockwise rotating storms of various sizes, similar to giant versions of terrestrial hurricanes. The south pole has never been seen from this viewpoint, although the Cassini spacecraft was able to observe most of the polar region at highly oblique angles as it flew past Jupiter on its way to Saturn in 2000. (JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / NASA)
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digdoug
14 days ago
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Humans are awesome.
Louisville, KY
DMack
12 days ago
I think you're giving humans a little too much credit. I bet most of those planets don't even have any humans!
popular
11 days ago
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reconbot
13 days ago
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New York City
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1 public comment
chrisrosa
14 days ago
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some stunning otherworld(ly) shots.
San Francisco, CA

Koya Bound, beautiful photographs from Japanese pilgrimage path

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Koya Bound

Craig Mod and Dan Rubin recently walked the Kumano Kodo pilgrimage path in Japan, taking thousands of photos along the way. They made a book of the photographs and have launched a Kickstarter project to make more copies of the book and do some other fun stuff.

The book, of course, is beautiful -- Rubin and Mod are great photographers and designers - but direct your attention to the economy of their project description:

In March of this year, Dan Rubin and I went on a walk. The walk was along Japan's 1,000+ year old Kumano Kodo pilgrimage path.

From that walk, we made one copy of a book of photographs called Koya Bound.

Together, with your help, we'd like to make/do a whole lot more...

This is what we did, here's what we made, and we'd like your help to do more. That's how you do Kickstarter, folks.

Tags: books   Craig Mod   Dan Rubin   Japan   photography
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digdoug
19 days ago
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Telling that he talks about his friendship with "The 1000 True Fans" Kevin Kelly in the descriptions too.
Louisville, KY
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August 28, 2016 - Greek Mosaics

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"Imagine the thrill of unearthing three ancient greek mosaics dating back 2,220 years ago. Back in 2014, Professor Kutalmış Görkay of Ankara University and his team of archeologists discovered three ancient greek mosaics in the Turkish city of Zeugma near the boarders of Syria."
More here

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digdoug
29 days ago
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Louisville, KY
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"For the Colonel, It Was Finger?Lickin' Bad"

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KFC Finger Lickin Bad

Here's a gem from the archive of the NY Times. One day in September 1976, NY Times food critic Mimi Sheraton and Colonel Harland Sanders stopped into a Manhattan Kentucky Fried Chicken. The Colonel, then estranged from the company he founded, strolled into the kitchen after glad-handing some patrons and proceeded to tear into the quality of the food:

Once in the kitchen, the colonel walked over to a vat full of frying chicken pieces and announced, 'That's much too black. It should be golden brown. You're frying for 12 minutes -- that's six minutes too long. What's more, your frying fat should have been changed a week ago. That's the worst fried chicken I've ever seen. Let me see your mashed potatoes with gravy, and how do you make them?"

When Mr. Singleton explained that he first mixed boiling water into the instant powdered potatoes, the colonel interrupted. "And then you have wallpaper paste," he said. "Next suppose you add some of this brown gravy stuff and then you have sludge." "There's no way anyone can get me to swallow those potatoes," he said after tasting some. "And this cole slaw. This cole slaw! They just won't listen to me. It should he chopped, not shredded, and it should be made with Miracle Whip. Anything else turns gray. And there should be nothing in it but cabbage. No carrots!"

Sanders sold his company to an investment group in 1964, which took the company public two years later and eventually sold to a company called Heublein. After selling, Sanders officially still worked for the company as an advisor but grew more and more dissatisfied with it, as evidenced by the story above. When the company HQ moved to Tennessee, the Colonel was quoted as saying:

This ain't no goddam Tennessee Fried Chicken, no matter what some slick, silk-suited son-of-a-bitch says.

And he got sued by a KFC franchisee after he commented:

My God, that gravy is horrible. They buy tap water for 15 to 20 cents a thousand gallons and then mix it with flour and starch and end up with pure wallpaper paste. And I know wallpaper paste, by God, because I've seen my mother make it.

To the "wallpaper paste" they add some sludge and sell it for 65 or 75 cents a pint. There's no nutrition in it and the ought not to be allowed to sell it.

And another thing. That new crispy chicken is nothing in the world but a damn fried doughball stuck on some chicken.

Colonel Sanders: serving up chicken and sick burns with equal spiciness. (via @mccanner)

Tags: food   Harland Sanders   KFC   Mimi Sheraton   restaurants
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digdoug
29 days ago
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I love this town. And all it's beskeleton'd closets.

(KFC is based in Louisville now)
Louisville, KY
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fxer
29 days ago
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My father still mentions this interview every time he passes a KFC, 40 years later.
Bend, Oregon
sirshannon
30 days ago
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Dang.

An Explorer’s Ode to America’s National Parks (20 photos)

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Mark Burns spent five years visiting all 59 of the United States' national parks. Captured in stirring black and white images, his landscape photography project was completed just in time for the National Park Service's centennial celebration. “It's a time to reflect on the rich history of our national parks,” Burns said of his 160,000-mile journey, “but it's also a time to plan wisely for the next 100 years.” Glacier Bay's wild coastline, Death Valley's parched terrain, and Yellowstone's surging geysers are all pictured in searing detail. One image from each park is currently being exhibited at the Houston Museum of Natural Science until September 5th. A selection can be found below.

"Topeka Glacier," Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska (Mark Burns)
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digdoug
29 days ago
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Louisville, KY
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