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By escape from the potato planet in "He's been up all night listening to Mohammed's radio..." on MeFi

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Trump's first 63 days:

One of the largest protests in American history.

An unprecedented surge of grass-roots activism and political organizing on the left.

Two Muslim bans blocked by the courts.

Trump's National Security Advisor resigned in disgrace.

An FBI investigation into possible collusion with a foreign adversary to undermine American democracy.

Multiple high-profile lies that most Americans recognize as such.

Record-low approval ratings.

And the GOP caught bluffing with an empty hand on the signature issue that they've been shrieking about for seven years.

That's just a sample, of course.

This administration is still very much a grave threat, and we should not count on institutions to save us. But perhaps the arc of history may yet bend toward "get the fuck out of here, you loofah-faced shitgibbon"?

When fascists finally came to America, thank God they were so ear-fuckingly incompetent. The next batch might not be, and I remain deeply anxious about the future of democracy in America, and around the world. But if incompetence saves us from the current fascists – I mean, shit, I'll take it.
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deezil
23 hours ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
digdoug
1 day ago
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Louisville, KY
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A Little Girl Steals Pope Francis’ Hat While Attending a Greeting at the Vatican in Rome

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Mountain Butorac, the godfather of three-year-old Estella Westrick, took his goddaughter to a Papal Audience service to see Pope Francis earlier this week at the Vatican in Rome. When Estella got a chance to actually meet the Pope, she took the hat right off of his head while he was giving her a kiss on the cheek.

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digdoug
2 days ago
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I am not at all surprised that The Pope has a *great* old man laugh.
Louisville, KY
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By clawsoon in "Meritocracy rewards bad people for writing good code" on MeFi

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Itaxpica: The takeaway seems to be "look, a small number of people at these companies have vile beliefs" which is so true of pretty much any company on Earth that it's essentially meaningless; the author wants to, but doesn't actually really manage to, make this about tech in particular.

There was one interesting bit that definitely made it about tech:

Such bias may be particularly rife in Silicon Valley because of another of its foundational beliefs: that success in tech depends almost entirely on innate genius. ...a 2015 study published in Science confirmed that computer science and certain other fields, including physics, math, and philosophy, fetishize "brilliance," cultivating the idea that potential is inborn. The report concluded that these fields tend to be problematic for women, owing to a stubborn assumption that genius is a male trait.


I haven't been immune to this particular bias. As I've gotten older, though, and raised a child, I've realized how much of my own ability to solve complex problems depends on plenty of sleep and lack of distractions. As a young white male who was "the smart kid" and expected to do smart things, I was given - much more than I realized then - the freedom to focus on learning and developing my problem-solving abilities. Everyone else had confidence that I was smart, so I got that confidence, too, and the privileges that came with it.

Now I'm learning how much work - cognitive load, emotional and physical labour - goes into raising a child and keeping house. Being smart under these conditions is much, much more difficult. My family was poor, but growing up I was still given the privilege of being allowed to think about challenging, interesting problems, and I was able to turn that privilege into a series of well-paying tech jobs. Did I have some innate problem-solving ability? Sure, maybe a bit. But I'm willing to bet that a lot of people have that innate ability, but never get to exercise it, never gain confidence in it, because it's assumed that they'll be doing non-technical work. They're the wrong gender, or the wrong colour, or they give off the wrong cultural signals.

Whenever this topic comes up, I think of the best example of true genius that I know: Euler, it is said, "calculated with one hand while bouncing a baby on his knee with the other." If anybody in tech thinks they're a genius, I give them that challenge. If you've only produced brilliant results and done smart things while being insulated from distractions and responsibilities, then there are probably a whole bunch of women and people of colour who would've done better than you had they been given, from childhood till now, your privilege.
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digdoug
5 days ago
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Louisville, KY
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gerrycanavan: the goat, he screams like a man

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gerrycanavan:

the goat, he screams like a man

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jepler
11 days ago
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Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
digdoug
11 days ago
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Louisville, KY
emdot
6 days ago
The bleating truth.
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Amazing High Resolution Miniature Planets That Are 3D Printed to Scale

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Earth and Moon

George Ioannidis of Little Planet Factory has created a wonderful line of high resolution miniature planets, moons and solar systems, each of which are made to scale using a unique 3D printing method along with a bit of hand artistry. Ioannidis’ work is available for purchase through his site and through his Etsy store.

When it is time to make a globe, the model is not cast or moulded rather downloaded to machines able to construct it out of dust sized particles from the bottom up layer by layer, placing both colour and geometry accurately. What this means is no equatorial seam, custom sizes & scaling and impossible to traditionally manufacture full colour details. After construction is complete, each globe receives a manual inspection and a hand applied layer of protective coating before being securely packaged for dispatch.

Mini Solar System

Tiny Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Moon

Oblate Jupiter

Sun, Jupiter & Earth

via So Super Awesome

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digdoug
18 days ago
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Saving this.. might have to place an order.
Louisville, KY
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A neuroscientist explains a concept at five different levels

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Wired recently challenged neuroscientist Bobby Kasthuri to explain what a connectome is to people with five different levels of potential understanding: a 5-year-old, a 13-year-old, a college student, a neuroscience grad student, and an expert neuroscientist. His goal: “every person here can leave with understanding it at some level”.

Watching this, I kept thinking of Richard Feynman, who was particularly adept at describing concepts to non-experts without sacrificing truth or even nuance. See him explain fire, rubber bands, how trains go around curves, and magnets.

Tags: Bobby Kasthuri   neuroscience   Richard Feynman   science   video
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digdoug
21 days ago
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I love this video. I like the concept. I like the subject matter. Please do more, WIRED
Louisville, KY
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