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Charles Barkley: Sports Leagues ‘Should Force Guys to Get Vaccinated’

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Jade Scipioni, reporting for CNBC:

“Yes, I’m vaccinated,” says NBA legend Charles Barkley. “Everybody should be vaccinated. Period.”

“The only people who are not vaccinated are just assholes,” he says.

The 58-year-old NBA Hall-of-Famer says he personally thinks sports leagues should force players to get vaccinated. “Can you imagine if one of these guys that are not vaccinated, if they get one of these players’ kids, wives, girlfriends, moms and dads sick and they die over some unnecessary conspiracy bullshit,” Barkley says. “I think that would be tragic.”

More like this, please. (Via Paul Kafasis.)

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digdoug
4 hours ago
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"Assholes."
Louisville, KY
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Ignorance and the Curious Idiot

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From an interview with the Ted Lasso creative team, here’s co-creator and star Jason Sudeikis on where the idea for the show came from:

The thing Bill and I talked about in the pitch was this antithesis of the cocktail of a human man who is both ignorant and arrogant, which lo and behold, a Batman-villain version of it became president of the United States right around the same time. What if you played an ignorant guy who was actually curious? When someone used a big word like “vernacular,” he didn’t act like he knew it, but just stops the meeting like, “Question, what does that mean?”

Austin Kleon riffed on the unusual relationship between ignorance and curiosity:

That last point might be the most important: care is a form of attention, and unlike talent or expertise, it can be willed into being at any time.

If you care more than everybody else, you pay better attention, and you see things that others don’t see. To ask the questions that need to be asked, you have to care more than others about what happens, but care less about what others might think of you in the moment.

Which makes me think about my favorite scene from Lady Bird, summarized here by A.O. Scott:

Sister Sarah Joan (Lois Smith), the principal, has read Lady Bird’s college application essay. “It’s clear how much you love Sacramento,” Sister Sarah remarks. This comes as a surprise, both to Lady Bird and the viewer, who is by now aware of Lady Bird’s frustration with her hometown.

“I guess I pay attention,” she says, not wanting to be contrary.

“Don’t you think they’re the same thing?” the wise sister asks.

The idea that attention is a form of love (and vice versa) is a beautiful insight.

These thoughts resonated with me today because I recently had a falling-out with someone I care about, in part because I paid insufficient attention to who they were as a person. I was ignorant and incurious in our relationship, a disastrous combination that caused deep pain. In the aftermath, I instinctively reached for the comfort of a rewatch of the first season of Ted Lasso, hoping for some laughs. But what I especially noticed this time around was how much effort Coach Lasso puts into deciphering who people are, who they really are, so he can help each individual be their best selves, which is perhaps the hallmark of a wonderful partnership. It was a good reminder for me of attention as a form of love but also of the work I need to do to actually practice that consistently in my life.

Tags: Austin Kleon   Jason Sudeikis   Lady Bird   Ted Lasso   TV
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digdoug
3 days ago
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The Lady Bird quote reminds me of a really short podcast I keep subscribed to, Happiness Spells, that closes every episode with, "[...] and remember, Love is the same thing as paying attention."
Louisville, KY
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Languages Infographic

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Do more people speak Telugu than Italian? Yes. Really interesting graphic showing that the world is even more Asian than you thought.

A World of Languages




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acdha
2 days ago
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Washington, DC
digdoug
3 days ago
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Louisville, KY
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Retro Modern Movie Posters

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retro modern movie poster for Groundhog Day

retro modern movie poster for Star Wars

retro modern movie poster for Dunkirk

Check out these retro modern movie posters from Patrick Concepcion; the Groundhog Day one is simple perfection. You can check out Concepcion’s work on his website and Instagram or buy prints on Etsy.

Tags: Patrick Concepcion   design   movies
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digdoug
17 days ago
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Oooh.
Louisville, KY
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Auction

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
The problem with this comic is the economists who get it won't see why it's a joke.


Today's News:
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digdoug
30 days ago
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That bonus panel on the site is worth clicking through to today. Ooph.
Louisville, KY
denubis
30 days ago
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19th Century Colonization and Slavery in Charles Minard’s Flow Maps

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Flow maps are characterized by representing direction and amount of movement between an origin and a destination – and Charles Joseph Minard is widely regarded as the first cartographer who mastered the art of the flow map.  He is best known for his flow map of Napolean’s 1812 invasion of Russia titled “Carte figurative des pertes successives en hommes de l’armée française dans la campagne de Russie 1812-1813,published in 1869, but many of his lesser-known earlier works are fascinating in their own right.

While modern digital mapping techniques have changed the way flow maps are created, Minard’s work stands out as encompassing all the techniques of graphical illustration that geographers still seek to achieve in flow maps made today.  His aim was to allow a map reader to quickly understand the magnitude and direction of statistical geographic data that would otherwise need to be communicated through more complex graphs or charts.

1862 flow map showing movement of people across the globe, with the size of flow lines indicating the magnitude of migration using size and color.

Carte figurative et approximative représentant pour l’année 1858 les émigrants du globe, les pays dóu ils partent et ceux oú ils arrivent.  Charles Joseph Minard, 1862. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress.

Many of Minard’s early maps document the movement of goods and people during a period of global colonization and slavery. In the above flow map from 1862, Minard mapped global flows of human migration for the year 1858. The number of emigrants are represented by the colored lines at the rate of one millimeter for each 1,500 emigrants.

Flow lines showing emigration from Central Africa, showing migrants from Central Africa moving east toward British and French colonies

Detail of African emigration flows on Minard’s 1862 map

These numbers are also written across the lines with a unit of one thousand emigrants. Looking at the lines in detail, you can see the number of emigrants rise and fall as flow lines merge and depart from each other.  Seen in the detailed image on the left, the map documents flows of Africans departing Central Africa for Reunion and Mauritius, at the time French and British colonies.  Also visible on the full maps are flows of Africans into the Caribbean alongside lines from China and South Asia. In 1858, slavery was not yet abolished globally, which means this movement of people includes forced migration through slavery or indentured servitude. The map also shows the heavy movement from northern Europe into the United States, as well as British emigrants who moved to Canada, the United States, and Australia (which would include the movement of British prisoners to Australia).

Another of Minard’s creations shows the global cotton trade over time: comparing the flow of cotton in 1858 and 1861.

Minard's 1862 flow chart of European cotton imports with two maps (1858 and 1861) showing global cotton exports using lines of varying widths and colors.

Carte figurative et approximative des quantitiés de coton en laine importées en Europe en 1858 et en 1861. Charles Joseph Minard, 1862. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress.

In both the 1858 and 1861 illustrations, the flow of cotton exports out of the United States into Europe and England dominate with map. In 1858, slavery in the southern United States was actively producing huge amounts of cotton at such volumes that many southern states believed the cotton industry could sustain their secession from the United States. 1861 marks the year southern states seceded and American Civil War broke out, at which point the United States blocked Confederate ports. Eventually the Confederacy itself stopped selling cotton to Europe and the United Kingdom in an attempt to pressure them into supporting their side during the war.  The United Kingdom more than doubled their imports of cotton from India from 70,000 tons to 180,000 tons to compensate.

Minard's 1866 flow map of cotton imports to Europe, showing cotton exports using colored lines of varying sizes.

“Carte figurative et approximative des quantités de coton brut importées en Europe en 1858, en 1864 et en 1865. Charles Joseph Minard, 1866. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress.

Minard also mapped the flow of cotton at the end of the American Civil War, showing 1858 numbers against 1864 and 1865 with each millimeter of line representing five thousand tons of cotton. The resulting map shows the ebb and flow of American cotton dominance, from the height of “King Cotton” in 1858 during a period of legal slavery, the shift to a reliance on Indian cotton by 1864, and a rebalancing in 1865 as the Civil War ended.  After the war, southern plantation owners were allowed to keep their land, allowing for the creation of a system of share-cropping that would come to dominate the cotton industry. Also notable is the expansion of cotton exports from Northern Africa and the Middle East to the United Kingdom during this period.

As fights over human freedom shifted the global economy and movement of goods and people during the 1860s, Minard’s flow maps served to make complex global processes legible to the casual map reader, a feat many still strive to achieve today.

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digdoug
32 days ago
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Louisville, KY
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