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Today's Favorite Twitter Exchange

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The post Today's Favorite Twitter Exchange appeared first on News From ME.

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digdoug
5 days ago
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Louisville, KY
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An Animated Mercator Projection That Reveals the Actual Size of Countries Around the World

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World Projection Actual Size Animation

Climate data scientist and interactive mapmaker Neil Kaye has brilliantly animated the difference between the size of countries represented on the Mercator Map and the true land layout of each country. Because the Mercator Map distorts land size in accordance with increased distance from the Equator, countries like Greenland, Russia, Canada and the United States look so much larger than much of the rest of the world.

The final state of the animation is associated to its correct square milage. I calculated this by taking the area of each country polygon in the Mercator projection (MA), and the the true area (TA), then I did: 1 / sqrt (MA/TA) So Greenland for example is scaled to be 0.25 the size of Mercator original, which makes it 16 times smaller than shown in Mercator projection! I then resized it at the centroid of each country” As has been pointed out for large countries like Russia, the top of the country should be shrunk more than the bottom, I have not done this. However, the true area of each country is correctly scaled. To give perspective, Greenland is actually the same size as Saudi Arabia.



The post An Animated Mercator Projection That Reveals the Actual Size of Countries Around the World appeared first on Laughing Squid.

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digdoug
7 days ago
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By NoxAeternum in "We can't save the world, but we can protect and care for [RPG.net]" on MeFi

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From the Motherboard piece:

"Different staff members had their own breaking points, but after Christine Ford's testimony, and Trump's public reaction to it, I don't think we had any more holdouts," the admins said. "If someone came to a dinner party and decided to mock a sexual assault victim at the table, I think most reasonable hosts would kick them out, or at least not invite them back again."


This is excellent framing, and shows how bankrupt the difference of opinion argument is.
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digdoug
7 days ago
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A Year in the Dark [EPISODE]

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Early on the morning of September 20th, 2017, a category four hurricane named Maria hit the island of Puerto Rico. It was a beast of a hurricane — the strongest one to hit the island since 1932. Wind speeds hit 155 miles per hour, making it almost a category five.

Daniel Alarcón went down to Puerto Rico to report on the aftermath of the storm. He wrote a piece for Wired about the almost year-long struggle to get power working on the island, and the utility worker who became a Puerto Rican folk hero.

Jorge Bracero

Jorge Bracero

The morning after the hurricane, lots of people woke up and surveyed the damage done to their homes. One of them was a man named Jorge Bracero, from the capital city of San Juan, who was completely caught off guard by how bad this storm was.

Jorge works at the Puerto Rican Electric Power Authority (PREPA), the public utility that provides electricity for nearly the entire island. When he got to work, he made his way over to a big computer screen that showed the outline of Puerto Rico. Every single line was down, which had never happened before.

The scale of the destruction was hard for Bracero to comprehend. He knew on that day that he would spend the next several months helping Puerto Rico recover through his work with PREPA. What he didn’t realize yet was that thousands of people would come to count specifically on him to help them get through their year in the dark.

Collapsing Giants

The first priority was to get power to essential structures, like hospitals and water treatment plants. The plant Bracero worked at was one of seven major ones on the island, but all of the others were down. Without those other power plants to help, his plant kept crashing.

Imagine a game of tug-of-war. The power plants are giants on one end, and the clients are on the other end pulling hard. If one power plant goes down, the other power plants have to work harder, sometimes to the point of collapse. After Maria, there was only one giant power plant on Jorge’s side of the rope, and on the other side, hospitals and water treatment plants were pulling for power on the other end. Every time there was a collapse, Jorge and his colleagues would have to spend hours rebooting everything and start again.

Outside of the plant, things were even worse. Lines were down all over the island and there weren’t nearly enough workers to fix them. Support would eventually arrive from the U.S mainland, but for the first week or so, Puerto Ricans were on their own. But Puerto Rico only had about 230 power brigades, which meant only about 690 people servicing the island, more or less — not nearly enough. As a point of comparison, the state of Florida had 16,000 workers on call in preparation for Hurricane Irma.

Un-PREPA-red

There’s a reason why Puerto Rico was so ill-prepared for Maria. In the decades before the storm, businesses had left the island in droves as the U.S. government phased out a series of tax breaks. To make up for all the lost revenue, the Puerto Rican government began borrowing money in the form of bonds.

Year after year, the government issued more and more bonds hoping things would turn around, but they didn’t. By the time Maria hit, the government was in the middle of an enormous debt crisis, and PREPA was not immune. The utility itself had nine billion dollars in debt, and was constantly postponing maintenance as a result.

On top of all of that, PREPA had basically no strategy for communicating with the public. It had no social media presence to keep the public updated to the situation. Jorge Bracero decided he would give the people the information they were craving — “I decided to become the news outlet.” He’d do it on his Facebook page, and he wouldn’t ask permission.

The One-Man Power News Outlet

In the beginning, Bracero’s posts were very technical and specific. He would explain that a certain brigade would be working in a certain area. This information was supposed to be for company use, but Jorge began leaking it to the public. Every night Bracero would come home from a sixteen hour shift at work and start writing.

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Special Update: Subestación ”Abuelo” energizacion estimada viernes o sábado Linea 5800Luz a pueblo viejo, Puerto…

Posted by Jorge Bracero on Thursday, December 7, 2017

Bracero would often spend up to four hours a day just writing and calling friends from the field, asking them to verify information. After he’d gathered all the information from his sources, he would type out extremely long posts — sometimes 1,000 words or more — with his thumbs on an iPhone. Bracero’s goal was to to give people the information they needed, but he also wanted to show them that people were actually out there working on getting their power back.

The challenge with Puerto Rico’s geography is that a mountain range cuts across the center of the island. A majority of the population lives above this mountain range, but the majority of power is located below it. Servicing the towers that were down in the mountains was not easy, and would sometimes require dropping in by helicopter and hiking to a tower.

Cordillera Central is the main mountain range that crosses the island from west to east and divides the island into northern and southern coastal plains.

On top of the difficulty of the work, PREPA just didn’t have the supplies it needed. Ten days before Maria, Hurricane Irma had done major damage in Florida. A few weeks before that, Hurricane Harvey had wreaked havoc in Texas. This meant that all the things Puerto Rico needed were high demand in other places

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14-diciembre-2017 _ Los muchachos de la AEE Comercial Vega Baja trabajando fuerte a las 10:25 am en la Calle 1 de la Urb. Villa Real de nuestro pueblo de Vega Baja frente a la oficina del dentista Ariel Jusino Córdova y adyacente a la Farmacia y Cafetería Villa Real de mi amigo el Lcdo. Ramón Monchito Cano. Estoy casi convencido que hoy le llega la luz a ambos para que dejen descansar las plantas eléctricas que han utilizado por 85 días para brindarle sin fallar el servicio a sus clientes y/o pacientes. Espero que Dios permita que todos los vecinos de ese mismo bloque reciban luz en o antes de que se termine la noche y eso incluye a mi primita Annie Melendez Rivera y también a la distinguida madre de mi amiga Grisel Marrero Marrero quién tiene sobre 100 años y necesita más que nadie la electricidad de regreso en su casa. Así lo quiera Dios, Amén. Sitios, rincones y sectores en Vega Baja que no tienen luz (14-diciembre-2017):Urb. Villa del RosarioResidencial Enrique CatoniExtensión CatoniParte de la Urb. Villa RealUrb. GuaricoReparto SobrinoLa Corchado en el pueblo de Vega BajaCalle Sánchez LópezPueblo NuevoCeiba SabanaBrisas de Tortuguero Río ArribaLas GranjasUrb. Jardines de Vega BajaParte de la Urb. Alturas de Vega BajaParcelas AmadeoLos NaranjosUrb. San DemetrioCarmelitaRío AbajoLa Trocha Almirante NorteAlmirante SurParte de la Urb. Colinas del Marqués Urb. VelomasBrisas del RosarioArenalesLa PlayaPanaini, ColomboSector Santa RosaUrb. Villa Pinares Urb. Ciara del Sol en GuaricoParte de la Barriada SandínCarretera 646 Sector Lomba, entrando por el Centro de Envejecientes Bartolo JoyPugnado Adentro Quebrada ArenasCarr. 644 Sector La Línea …y todos los que ustedes añadan a la lista.Vídeoclip y fotos tomadas por Robert Rivera#AEE#TEAMAEE#IluminaMiPueblo#PRSeLevanta#PUERTORICOSELEVANTA#VegaBaja#PuertoRico#HuracánMaría#NOESTÁSOLVIDADOJaime BraceroThomas Jimmy Rosario MartinezRamon Monchito CanoAnnie Melendez RiveraCarmen Rey

Posted by Robert Rivera on Thursday, December 14, 2017

Bracero was trying his best to explain the reality of these challenges in getting power on the ground through his Facebook posts. He had accumulated tens of thousands of followers on Facebook, and over time Bracero’s posts earned him a kind of celebrity status on the island — memes featuring his likeness and activities began to surface, too.

All I Want for Christmas is Luz

By Christmas about half of the island had its power restored, but the mood on the island was grim. Many people were still in the dark, and no one felt much like celebrating. Still there were moments of lightness. A local musician had re-written the Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas” replacing “all I want for Christmas is you” with “all I want for Christmas is luz,” meaning “light” in Spanish.

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A Cantar con la gran Karirmalice Ronda!!! Feliz Navidad a Todos!!!!!La versión original de ella y las diferentes canciones la pueden ver en su página But i love this one!!!Merry Xmas

Posted by Jorge Bracero on Monday, December 25, 2017

By spring of 2018 around 85% of the island had power, but there were still thousands of people who didn’t. Bracero continued with his daily updates about which lines were being fixed and where the brigades were headed next. To keep up a sense of momentum and share some hope, he also shared videos as new places got power.

Bracero began asking people to record videos of their lights coming back on, and every week a new town celebrated.

The Next One

Finally, in August of 2018 PREPA announced that the entire island had been reconnected to the grid, just six weeks before the one-year anniversary of Maria — and just in time for the next hurricane season.

Still, PREPA is arguably in a worse place than it was before Maria for a number of reasons. Among other things, there has been a lack of steady leadership over the last year — five different directors have cycled through the position at the helm.

For years, too, FEMA had a strange rule in place that damaged infrastructure couldn’t be replaced with anything better or more expensive. For example, wooden posts couldn’t be replaced with stronger metal posts. As a result, Puerto Ricans missed out on opportunities to improve their infrastructure. It’s the same grid they had before, with a population that is significantly more vulnerable.

Puerto Ricans were traumatized by Maria — by the destruction and the loss of life, of course, but also by the realization that the security they felt before the storm was an illusion, and that no one could help them fast enough. As Daniel Alarcón puts it, what the “aftermath of the storm told them [was] essentially: we don’t care about you. You’re forgotten. You don’t matter. The depth of this wound is just very, very deep.”

PREPA is in the process of privatizing, and being sold off, piece by piece, in hopes that a private company or various private companies will be able to deliver better service than the government has. A lot of people are skeptical that privatization will have this desired effect.

Pepino Power Authority alt logo created for Samantha Bee’s Full Frontal series on Puerto Rico

When asked if he thinks the island is ready for the next hurricane Jorge Bracero’s answer is a definitive no. “We need time and just — just give us maybe two years — just give us that time in which our people can keep working, keep working, keep working so that system can hold a little longer.”

The post A Year in the Dark appeared first on 99% Invisible.

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digdoug
7 days ago
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this was such a great episode
Louisville, KY
reconbot
8 days ago
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New York City
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The 1981 Sears Wish Book

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The arrival of the Sears Wish Book each year was a major deal for our family. Living out on a rural farm, this was our strongest connection to physical goods of the world.

I poured over this 1981 edition for days on end—maybe months—carefully making a birthday and Christmas list.

I was 10 years old, trying my best to include selections both reasonable and outlandish.

I’m sad to hear that Sears is filing for bankruptcy. I’m angry that it’s another result of private equity saddling a company with debt and stripping it of value—lining the pockets of hedge-fund operators.

Alas, I’ll set those feelings aside and remember the joy of wishful thinking, carefully turning each page.

View a bunch more spreads on Flickr.

p 452 – If only I got that guitar or violin, I would learn to play… (We eventually got a fiddle, I did not learn.)

p 487 – That snow jet sled would make it so awesome to go down the hill and be able to steer! (Never got it, bet it was top heavy and dumb anyway.)

p 534 – I DID get the Charlie McCarthy ventriloquist doll. We removed the monocle and mom made us matching plaid shirts.

p 549 – I learned printmaking from the Great Greetings Plates.

p 555 – Brushed up on math with the Little Professor.

p 559 – Used the heck out of that Crayola Caddy.

p 562 – Paint & Swirl was a mess, but the Rock Tumblr was fun until the polishing pellets were gone.

p 617 – I could spend hours with that Winnie the Pooh cube puzzle

p 624 – I once was laying my head on the ground playing with a Stomper 4×4, trying to get the perspective of a camera shooting a movie. The battery operated truck’s tires got wound up in my hair and they parents had to use scissors to cut it out.

p 637 – Star Wars! Probably the page I looked at The Most. I wanted that AT-AT soooooo bad.

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digdoug
11 days ago
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The Social Media Transformation of César Sayoc: I disagree

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In today’s New York Times, I find an article tracing the evolution of the Trump Supporter’s campaign to kill Democrats from his “normal” Facebook posts, to his “extremist” Twitter account. The article begins:

Until 2016, Cesar Altieri Sayoc Jr.’s life on social media looked unremarkable. On his Facebook page, he posted photos of decadent meals, gym workouts, scantily clad women and sports games — the stereotypical trappings of middle-age masculinity.

This may be common, but it is far from “unremarkable” as reporter Kevin Roose states.  I remarked many things about it. Then a quote from an expert in digital journalism:

“He went from posting pictures of women, real estate, dining and cars to posting pictures of ISIS, guns and people in jail,” said Jonathan Albright, the research director for Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism. “It’s a remarkable change.”

From unremarkable to remarkable. However, here is what I remarked in the first incarnation of Mr. Sayoc’s online persona.  “Scantily clad women” denotes objectification; women as things, not people; decadent meals signal affluence and pleasure; real estate and cars are signs of prestige, money and power. All of these are signs of toxic masculinity, an idea of human relationships as transactional and impersonal, a technocratic bent, and a desire for male domination. These are completely consistent with the Twitter account, the support of Trump, and, eventually, the pipe bombs.

I’d suggest the proper way to frame this article is as a continuum of his offenses, displayed on social media. Just as many mass killers begin with domestic violence, many perverts as peeping toms; just as sexual harassers will forge expense reports, or take credit for other people’s work, the signs of violence are often visible in other actions and evidenced in seemingly minor social media posts online. “Criminal versatility” is common, and criminal tendencies can be read in early prejudices. I see the signs of César Sayoc’s tendencies already writ large on his Facebook page.


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digdoug
14 days ago
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