data wrangler
1161 stories
·
32 followers

Early 90s computing nostalgia

1 Comment and 2 Shares

Ahh, this photo takes me back to the early 90s. Boom box, IBM PC AT (with a 286 processor), NES cartridge, JUST DO IT.

1991 Computer Render

Except that’s not actually a photo. Daniel Karner rendered that scene in 3D using 3ds Max and V-Ray. Here’s the wireframe:

1991 Computer Wireframe

See also celebrities using computers in the 80s/90s (Corey Haim, Shakira, Brad Pitt, Christian Bale) and me using a computer in 1996.

Kottke Computing 1996

Tags: Daniel Karner
Read the whole story
digdoug
7 days ago
reply
One of my favorite things with Halt and Catch Fire is the giant monitors and tremendously huge fonts on said monitors.
Louisville, KY
Share this story
Delete

Encounters in the Realm of the Renowned #10

1 Share

Malcolm X and Muhammad Ali
Read the whole story
digdoug
10 days ago
reply
Louisville, KY
Share this story
Delete

A list of 25 Principles of Adult Behavior by John Perry Barlow

4 Comments and 17 Shares

Silicon Valley visionary John Perry Barlow died last night at the age of 70. When he was 30, the EFF founder (and sometime Grateful Dead lyricist) drew up a list of what he called Principles of Adult Behavior. They are:

1. Be patient. No matter what.
2. Don’t badmouth: Assign responsibility, not blame. Say nothing of another you wouldn’t say to him.
3. Never assume the motives of others are, to them, less noble than yours are to you.
4. Expand your sense of the possible.
5. Don’t trouble yourself with matters you truly cannot change.
6. Expect no more of anyone than you can deliver yourself.
7. Tolerate ambiguity.
8. Laugh at yourself frequently.
9. Concern yourself with what is right rather than who is right.
10. Never forget that, no matter how certain, you might be wrong.
11. Give up blood sports.
12. Remember that your life belongs to others as well. Don’t risk it frivolously.
13. Never lie to anyone for any reason. (Lies of omission are sometimes exempt.)
14. Learn the needs of those around you and respect them.
15. Avoid the pursuit of happiness. Seek to define your mission and pursue that.
16. Reduce your use of the first personal pronoun.
17. Praise at least as often as you disparage.
18. Admit your errors freely and soon.
19. Become less suspicious of joy.
20. Understand humility.
21. Remember that love forgives everything.
22. Foster dignity.
23. Live memorably.
24. Love yourself.
25. Endure.

Here’s what these principles meant to Barlow:

I don’t expect the perfect attainment of these principles. However, I post them as a standard for my conduct as an adult. Should any of my friends or colleagues catch me violating one of them, bust me.

You can read remembrances of Barlow from the EFF and from his friends Cory Doctorow and Steven Levy. The EFF wrote:

Barlow was sometimes held up as a straw man for a kind of naive techno-utopianism that believed that the Internet could solve all of humanity’s problems without causing any more. As someone who spent the past 27 years working with him at EFF, I can say that nothing could be further from the truth. Barlow knew that new technology could create and empower evil as much as it could create and empower good. He made a conscious decision to focus on the latter: “I knew it’s also true that a good way to invent the future is to predict it. So I predicted Utopia, hoping to give Liberty a running start before the laws of Moore and Metcalfe delivered up what Ed Snowden now correctly calls ‘turn-key totalitarianism.’”

Barlow’s lasting legacy is that he devoted his life to making the Internet into “a world that all may enter without privilege or prejudice accorded by race, economic power, military force, or station of birth … a world where anyone, anywhere may express his or her beliefs, no matter how singular, without fear of being coerced into silence or conformity.”

Tags: Cory Doctorow   John Perry Barlow   lists   Steven Levy
Read the whole story
digdoug
11 days ago
reply
Mr Barlow would definitely give me a "D" as an adult. But I'm trying.
Louisville, KY
notadoctor
7 days ago
reply
Oakland, CA
popular
9 days ago
reply
etwilson
11 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
3 public comments
StunGod
10 days ago
reply
That's a worthwhile list. I think I'll appropriate it.
Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth
TimidWerewolf
11 days ago
reply
Words to live by
dnorman
11 days ago
reply
fantastic guidelines. focus. give a shit. love.
Calgary

Online Communities Gone Bad (and getting them back on track)

2 Shares

After my appearance on the podcast Masters of Scale, a lot of people have written to me for advice on managing their communities. Here’s one request and my response, which I posted with permission, in the interest of making the internet a more civilized place.

Things had gotten so bad in this founder’s community, that even employees were thinking of leaving. The team felt hamstrung by their users. He explains:

When we first started our community I was in there posting every day setting the tone. Over the years as the company scaled I chose to spend time on other things beside posting in the forum. Gradually over time things got bad…then really bad…now horrible. 5-10 members of the community have started berating everyone in between posting useful content. Do you have any principles or experiences I can draw upon to think about how to solve this?

Yes, I wrote back, this community has run amok. A garden needs both fertilizer and weedkiller. But most of all it needs a gardener. Go back in and participate as much as before. Community manage with a heavy hand. Promote good people, respond to them.  Make them shine. Build good admin tools to silence bad actors.

You have to take a “iron fist in velvet glove” approach; warn borderline cases, and discuss their behavior with them. Often they can be rehabilitated. But for those who will not change: ruthlessly delete the accounts of abusive people, irrespective of their contributions. Keeping 5-10 bad people have undoubtedly lost you dozens, even hundreds, that you don’t even know about. They’ve stifled other people who are still participating and darkened the atmosphere of the whole community.

Community management is art, not science. There is no black and white when dealing with people. Choose your community team carefully, and find people with good instincts. Have all members of the team participate in the community. And be present there yourself.



Read the whole story
digdoug
12 days ago
reply
Louisville, KY
Share this story
Delete

#1376; In which Much is read

2 Comments and 4 Shares

all fiction is autobiography

Read the whole story
digdoug
12 days ago
reply
This stings.
Louisville, KY
MaryEllenCG
12 days ago
reply
Greater Bostonia
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
jsled
13 days ago
reply
it. me.
South Burlington, Vermont

Stunning photography of The Beatles shot with “technical mastery and a totally unique style and attitude”

1 Comment and 2 Shares
Astrid Kirchherr, John in Bowler hat, 1964

Say hello, hello to a stunning new book of photographs of the Fab Four themselves, shot by Astrid Kirchherr who according to none other than George Harrison, was “the one, really, who influenced our image more than anybody. She made us look good.”

Kirchherr was still just a student of art and fashion when she began turning her lens to greats like The Beatles when they visited her native Hamburg. At that time, the band was still pre-Ringo, with a lineup of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Pete Best and Stuart Sutcliffe. According to the book’s publisher Damiani, the young photographer “was struck by their 'raw energy, beauty and attitude' and there was an instant attraction between her and the band's bass player Stuart, to whom she soon became engaged.” Hard luck for her boyfriend, the artist Klaus Voormann, who had initially introduced her to the band in a club on the Hamburg's Reeperbahn.

The book of Kirchherr’s images, entitled Astrid Kirchherr with The Beatles, presents more than 70 images alongside materials that “retrace the close and intimate relationship which grew between the photographer and the band, portraying them as only she could - 'with precise shots, technical mastery and a totally unique style and attitude’.” It also features an introductory essay by Vladislav Ginzburg. The snaps in the book include early shots of the original line-up at a fairground in Hamburg in 1960, self-portraits, shots of Voormann and Reinhart Wolf, and portraits of Sutcliffe in Reinhart's studio and other locations after he left the band to develop his career as an artist.

When Sutcliffe tragically died in 1962 “Astrid captures the moment when John sits down to mourn in Stuart's attic studio, supported by George. Sensing the gravity of the moment John asks her to take portraits of him in the dark studio,” says the publisher.

A couple of years later, Kirchherr shadowed The Beatles during the filming of A Hard Day’s Night in 1964 with photojournalist Max Scheler for Stern, using 35mm film for the first time. Her candid snapshots narrate the dichotomy of what it means to be a celebrity on set, and off it, and she went on to shoot the grittier streets around Liverpool and teenagers outside the Cavern Club.

You can’t buy me love, but you can buy this book when it’s published on 1 March this year, for £22.50.

Astrid Kirchherr,  John Lennon, Stuart Sutcliffe and George Harrison  on a truck at the fairground, 1960

Astrid Kirchherr, John Lennon, Stuart Sutcliffe and George Harrison on a truck at the fairground, 1960

Astrid Kirchherr, Boys outside of the Cavern Club, 1964

Astrid Kirchherr, Boys outside of the Cavern Club, 1964

Astrid Kirchherr, John Lennon and Stuart Sutcliffe at the fairground, 1960

Astrid Kirchherr, John Lennon and Stuart Sutcliffe at the fairground, 1960

Astrid Kirchherr, Paul McCartney and George Harrison, 1963

Astrid Kirchherr, Paul McCartney and George Harrison, 1963

Astrid Kirchherr, The Beatles at the fairground, 1960

Astrid Kirchherr, The Beatles at the fairground, 1960

Astrid Kirchherr, The Beatles on set at A Hard Day's Night 1964

Astrid Kirchherr, The Beatles on set at A Hard Day's Night 1964

Max Scheler, Astrid Kirchherr in front of the Cavern Club, 1964

Max Scheler, Astrid Kirchherr in front of the Cavern Club, 1964

Astrid Kirchherr, self-portrait, 1960

Astrid Kirchherr, self-portrait, 1960

Astrid Kirchherr With The Beatles, cover

Astrid Kirchherr With The Beatles, cover

Read the whole story
digdoug
12 days ago
reply
If my stepfather was still alive, I'd have Christmas for him all sewn up now.
Louisville, KY
darthduckie
12 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories